Taxpayers Sink Deeper in Solyndra Saga: Part One

Bankrupt or not, Solyndra continues to dig deeper into taxpayers’ wallets. Over the past year, the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Justice (DOJ) have doled out approximately $2.5 million in taxpayer money to clean up the aftereffects of the failed Solyndra experiment. Apparently in the midst of all the paperwork, the federal government missed the memo instructing that when you’re in a hole, quit digging.

Based on the publicly available government records, the awards and contracts this blog discusses are separate from the money awarded to Solyndra as part of the loan guarantee program in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. When the government willingly risked $570 million of taxpayer money to fund Solyndra, there was good reason to be upset. But it reaches a whole new level when the federal government continues to award contracts intended to clean up the very mess it created. It’s ironic that the government is spending even more taxpayer dollars in an attempt to recoup the money it never should have spent.

So how many companies received Solyndra-related contracts? How much money was awarded and for what purpose? Three companies were awarded four different contracts totaling an estimated value of $2.5 million in taxpayer money. All involve throwing good money after bad in hopes of ameliorating the problems that the government’s poor discretion caused in the first place.

Read more at The Foundry. By Rachael Slobodien and Elinor Renner.

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